Review of Structural Materials & Methods for Home Building in the U.S.: 1900-2000

$45.00

This AIA approved continuing education course for architects is based on a study that  examines the evolvement of U.S. housing construction during the 20th century.  The AIA approves this course for 3 continuing education credits.

SKU: AIAPDH117 Categories: ,

Description

This AIA approved continuing education course for architects is based on a study that examines the evolvement of U.S. housing construction during the 20th century. Of particular interest are changes in construction practices associated with the materials and methods used in home building that affect structural performance. The purpose is to benchmark housing structural characteristics (as implied by historic practice), to identify significant changes that have occurred, and to provide an objective resource for discussion and evaluation of structural design implications. Other related interests, such as construction quality, are also considered.  The AIA (American Institute of Architects) has approved this course for 3 continuing education hours for licensed architects.  The hours are classified as HSW (health, safety, and welfare) learning units.

AIA CES Registered Course Number: AIAPDH117
Number of AIA CES Learning Units/HSW: 3.0LU/HSW (3.0 hours)

Learning Objectives:

Learning Objective 1: Upon completion of this course, the student will be aware of the recent history of home building with respect to relevant technical data on structural performance.

Learning Objective 2: The student will understand that the process of improving current housing value should include periodic evaluation to confirm past successes and to consider the ramifications of past decisions.

Learning Objective 3: The student will be able to use these findings to help foster future advancement in the interest of even better housing value.

Learning Objective 4: The student will learn there have been many changes in materials and tools that require more precision in construction, resulting in a greater potential for error, particularly in connections. Accordingly, more attention should be given to connection details that balance structural needs with the intuition and capability of the

View Course PDF   Preview Final Exam