Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach Part 2

$105.00

This course has been developed in response to widespread interest for improving both mobility choices and community character through a commitment to creating and enhancing walkable communities. Parts 1 and 2 of this course should both be completed.

 

SKU: AIAPDH140 Categories: ,

Description

Course Description:

Walkable communities are urban places that support walking as an important part of people’s daily travel through a complementary relationship between transportation, land use and the urban design character of the place. This course has been developed in response to widespread interest for improving both mobility choices and community character through a commitment to creating and enhancing walkable communities. Traditionally, through thousands of years of human settlement, urban streets have performed multiple functions. Mobility was one of the functions, but economic and social functions were important as well. Retail and social transactions have occurred along most urban thoroughfares throughout history. While the concepts and principles of context sensitive solutions (CSS) are applicable to all types of transportation facilities, this course emphasizes thoroughfares in “walkable communities”—compact, pedestrian-scaled villages, neighborhoods, town centers, urban centers, urban cores and other areas where walking, bicycling and transit are encouraged. Parts 1 and 2 of this course should both be completed.

Learning Units: 7.0 LU/HSW (7 hours)

Learning Objective 1:

Upon completion of both Parts 1 and 2 of this course, the student will be familiar with the how multidisciplinary CSS planning and design process can address objectives and considerations not only for transportation facilities but also for the surrounding area, land uses, developments, economic and other activities and environmental conditions.

Learning Objective 2:

The student will understand the relationship, compatibility and  trade-offs that may be appropriate when balancing the needs of all users, adjoining land uses, environment and community interests when making decisions in the project development process.

Learning Objective 3:

The student will be aware of methods to provide a compact and mixed-use environment of urban buildings, public spaces and landscapes that support walking directly through the built environment and indirectly by supporting human and economic activities associated with adjacent and surrounding land uses.

Learning Objective 4:

The student will know of the need for building, landscape and thoroughfare design that is pedestrian-scale—in other words, that provides architectural and urban design features scaled and detailed to be appreciated by persons who are traveling slowly and observing from the sidewalk at street level.