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A Policy Guide to Steel Moment Frame Construction

$45.00

This course has been prepared to provide a nontechnical summary of the valuable information contained in four FEMA/SAC publications, an understanding of the risk associated with WSMF buildings, and the practical measures that can be taken to reduce this risk.

SKU: AIAPDH137 Categories: ,

Product Description

Course Description:

All steel-framed buildings derive basic structural support from a frame composed of horizontal steel beams and vertical steel columns. Structures must also be able to resist lateral forces produced by wind and earthquakes. In some steel frame structures, this lateral resistance is derived from the presence of diagonal braces or masonry or concrete walls. In welded steel moment-frame buildings (WSMF), the ends of the beams are rigidly joined to the columns so that the buildings can resist lateral forces without the assistance of additional braces or walls. However, earthquakes occur, the welded joints that form these connections can fail, and the building loses some of the strength and stiffness it needs to resist these loads. Once the welded joints fail, other types of damage can also occur, including damage to bolted joints and subsequent severing of beams or columns resulting in a localized collapse. Generally, WSMF buildings constructed in the period from 1964-1994 are vulnerable to this damage. This course has been prepared to provide a nontechnical summary of the valuable information contained in four FEMA/SAC publications, an understanding of the risk associated with WSMF buildings, and the practical measures that can be taken to reduce this risk.

Learning Units: 3.0 LU/HSW (3 hours)

Learning Objective 1:

Upon completion of this course, the student will know that welded steel moment-frames are more vulnerable to damage from earthquakes than older buildings with bolted or riveted joints.

Learning Objective 2:

The student will be aware of the FEMA/SAC project that culminated with the publication of four design practice guideline documents, including state-of-the-art recommendations that should be included in future building codes, as well as guidelines that may be applied voluntarily to assess and reduce the earthquake risk in our communities.

Learning Objective 3:

The student will understand that buildings constructed after 1994 and incorporating connection design and fabrication practices recommended by the FEMA/SAC program are anticipated to have significantly less vulnerability.

Learning Objective 4:

The student will know of practical measures that can be taken to reduce the risk associated with existing WSMF buildings.